Best Movies on recommended movies on netflix now Netflix Right Now
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Best Movies on recommended movies on netflix now Netflix Right Now
Cast: John C. Reilly, Julianne Moore, Jeremy Blackman, Tom Cruise, Philip Baker Hall, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ricky Jay, William H. Macy, Alfred Molina, Jason Robards, and Melora Walters Image via PolyGram Pictures Director: David Fincher Image via Sony Pictures Director: Wolfgang Petersen Editor's note: This post was last updated on September 17th to add Jaws. Cast: Kiana Madeira, Olivia Scott Welch, Benjamin Flores Jr., Sadie Sink, and more Cast: Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss, Lorraine Gray, and Murray Hamilton Cast: Viola Davis, Chadwick Boseman, Glynn Turman, Colman Domingo, and Michael Potts Never fear, though, because we here at Collider have a guide to help you find the perfect Netflix movies available in the U.S. We’ve thumbed through the library and assembled a list of some of the best films currently available for streaming, from classics to hidden gems to new releases and beyond. This list of the best movies on Netflix is updated weekly with all-new choices, so be sure to return the next time you're looking for something great to watch. While Silver Linings Playbook was billed as an “Oscar movie,” scoring eight nominations including Best Picture, at heart it’s really just a solid romantic comedy. Bradley Cooper plays a man suffering from bipolar disorder who moves back in with his parents after being released from a psychiatric hospital. He meets a recently widowed young woman who vows to help him get back with his ex-wife, but wouldn’t you know it, while training for a big dance competition Cooper and Lawrence accidentally fall in love. It’s charming and offbeat, owing to filmmaker David O. Russell’s unique sensibilities, and Cooper and Lawrence have tremendous chemistry. – Adam Chitwood Image via Netflix Director: Leigh Janiak Cast: Mike Myers, Elizabeth Hurley, Michael York, Mimi Rogers, Seth Green, and Will Ferrell Image via Universal Pictures Director: Steven Spielberg Cast: Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiCaprio, Kerry Washington, Samuel L. Jackson, Don Johnson, Walton Goggins, and James Remar Cast: Michael Keaton, Amy Ryan, Stanley Tucci, Tate Donovan, and Lauren Benati Writer: Bong Joon Ho and Kelly Masterson Cast: Ben Affleck, Morgan Freeman, James Cromwell, Liev Schreiber, Philip Baker Hall, and Colm Feore Cast: Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly, Sacha Baron Cohen, Amy Adams, Gary Cole, Leslie Bibb, Jane Lynch, and Michael Clarke Duncan Image via Sony Pictures Director: Adam McKay Quentin Tarantino ’s most financially successful film to date remains his 2012 Western epic Django Unchained , which is set in 1858 and tells the story of a freed slave’s quest to save his wife Broomhilda from the clutches of a ruthless plantation owner – with the help of a German bounty hunter , of course. Django Unchained is tremendously unsettling in terms of providing an unflinching glimpse at the lives of slaves in America , but it also has that Tarantino touch that makes it wildly entertaining – a combination that may strike some as odd or in poor taste. However you fall, DiCaprio’s menacing performance is undeniably among his very best, Foxx’s arc is particularly impressive, and it’s hard to argue with Waltz’s Oscar win for his supporting turn. – Adam Chitwood If you’re in the mood for a mind-bending blockbuster that makes you think, there’s really no bad time to watch Inception . The Christopher Nolan film was a bit of a gamble when it was made – a wildly expensive original movie in a landscape dominated by remakes and sequels and reboots. The gamble paid off, as this heist thriller about a group of people that go inside someone else’s mind to plant an idea was a box office phenomenon and racked up a couple of Oscars come awards season. The action sequences are completely inventive, the characters are charismatic and unique, and there’s an emotional hook at the center that makes you actually care about what’s happening. This is one of the best blockbusters ever made. – Adam Chitwood I know a drama set in the wake of 9/11 is a tough sell, but Worth is absolutely one of the best films of 2021. Based on a true story, it follows an attorney in Washington D.C. who is tasked with figuring out exactly how much each of the 9/11 victims' families will receive as part of insurance payouts, literally deciding each person's worth. He battles bureacracy and cynicism at every turn, and is touched by his interactions with the victims' families. Michael Keaton and Amy Ryan give terrific performances here, and Stanley Tucci is a scene-stealer as always. — Adam Chitwood If you’re in the mood to watch a really intense drama, it doesn’t get much more intense than Magnolia . After Boogie Nights put him on the map in a big way, filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson next decided to craft an intimate drama on the scale of a sprawling epic. The result is a three-hour opus following a variety of different characters on different emotional journeys that intersect in some way or another – Tom Cruise is a misogynistic self-help guru; William H. Macy is a former game show wiz kid; Julianne Moore is the trophy wife of a famous producer. By PTA’s own admission the film is a bit overstuffed, but it’s still one of the biggest and boldest swings of the 90s and almost certainly will make you cry. – Adam Chitwood Writer/director Paul Thomas Anderson is certainly one of the most ambitious filmmakers working today, but his 1997 magnum opus Boogie Nights remains not only one of his best movies, but a groundbreaking piece of work full-stop. Anderson chronicles the rise and fall of an energetic young man in the 1970s with a massive…talent. Casting Mark Wahlberg as Dirk Diggler was a stroke of genius, and the way Anderson fashions the burgeoning porn industry into a dysfunctional family drama is downright masterful. And that cast, man alive. Each and every ensemble member shines—when you have a film where Philip Seymour Hoffman isn’t the scene-stealer, you know you’ve got a stacked cast. Boogie Nights remains as entertaining, heartbreaking, and enthralling as ever almost two decades after its release. – Adam Chitwood Image via Paramount Pictures Director: J.J. Abrams Cast: Matthew Broderick, Mia Sara, Alan Ruck, Jeffrey Jones, and Jennifer Grey Image via Paramount Pictures Director/Writer: John Hughes If you’re a fan of The Crown and haven’t seen The Queen , that should be rectified. This 2006 drama was written by The Crown showrunner Peter Morgan and takes place in the immediate aftermath of Princess Diana’s tragic death. Helen Mirren won the Best Actress Oscar for her cold and measured performance as Queen Elizabeth, and the film lays bare the family’s complicated feelings towards Diana and how important public opinion is to keeping the monarchy intact. – Adam Chitwood Oscar-winning Parasite filmmaker Bong Joon Ho 's first English language film is a strange little beast. Set in an Ice Age post-apocalypse set off by failed climate control experiment, the entire film takes place within the confines of an ever-running global train that is home to the few survivors. A none too subtle spin on class warfare, Snowpiercer follows the desperate inhabitants of the lower-class posterior of the train, where they survive on disgusting gelatinous nutrition bars , as they stage a violent coup against the privileged, indulgent elite at the front of the train. Chris Evans turns his Captain America charisma and command to its darkest incarnation as Curtis, the man at the forefront of the rebellion who leads the charge to take over the engine room. Along the way, Snowpiercer travels through the caste system of the train cars, each new carriage a bizarre and fully-rendered habitat of its own, and paints a microcosmic picture of a warped society entirely contained on a single train. It also packs in some visceral combat scenes and an all-timer performance from Tilda Swinton . – Haleigh Foutch Image via The Weinstein Company Director/Writer: Quentin Tarantino If you’re looking for a dose of nostalgia, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery may do the trick. The 1997 comedy was a smash hit at the box office and invaded the zeitgeist like few other films. Mike Myers fills the title role of Austin Powers, a British spy who freezes himself until his archnemises Dr. Evil returns. That return happens in 1997, and we get a fish-out-of-water movie chock-full of terrific visual gags. Myers was clearly inspired by the James Bond franchise, and indeed for as silly as Austin Powers gets, it’s also a pretty darn compelling spy movie in and of itself. – Adam Chitwood Image via The Weinstein Company Writer/Director: David O. Russell Cast: Chris Evans, Tilda Swinton, John Hurt, Jamie Bell, Olivia Spencer, Ed Harris, Song Kang Ho Home The 85 Best Movies on Netflix Right Now By Collider Staff Updated 1 day ago Share Share Tweet Email Our handy, extensive guide is updated weekly with all-new picks. There are few directors who exploded onto the scene as fully formed as Steven Spielberg . At 29 years old, with his third feature film, Spielberg gave us the masterwork that is Jaws . Stack this up against the work of any filmmaker in the history of cinema, and the filmmaking prowess and storytelling genius on display at least matches the best of the best. This simple story of a shark terrorizing a small beach town during summer not only originated the “Summer Movie Season” but also served to make legions of moviegoers terrified to go into the water. It’s just as effective today as it was in 1975, recommended movies on netflix now making this all-timer a great watch at any given moment. – Adam Chitwood Once upon a time, Ben Affleck made a Jack Ryan movie – and it was pretty good! 2002’s The Sum of All Fears was released at a time when audiences were turning their backs on Affleck, but the film has aged really well. It’s a taught Tom Clancy thriller in which Affleck plays a CIA analyst racing against the clock to stop nuclear war between the U.S. and Russia, which is being triggered by an Austrian Neo-Nazi. It’s a tense governmental thriller, but also genuinely shocking when you get into the third act. – Adam Chitwood The Game is kind of a hidden gem in director David Fincher 's filmography. The 1997 film marked his follow-up to Se7en , and he decided to tell a mystery that’s all about leading your audience along. Michael Douglas plays a wealthy investment banker who is given a gift for his birthday from his brother: a real-world “game” that offers the experience of a lifetime. As the story unfolds, the audience is unsure as to whether what’s happening is part of the game, or actually real. Your repeat viewing mileage may vary as it’s a film that you can only be surprised by once, but there’s some great filmmaking on display from Fincher and Douglas gives a swell performance. – Adam Chitwood Few franchise reboots have been as successful or as thrilling as J.J. Abrams ’ 2009 film Star Trek . The film had the unenviable task of introducing younger versions of iconic Star Trek characters while also serving as an exciting and surprising journey all its own. The brilliant fix is that in this story, Leonard Nimoy ’s Spock travels through a wormhole back in time to interact with the younger version of Kirk , which then sets these characters on a timeline path that has the potential to stray from adventures seen in the original Star Trek series. But beyond that genius fix, Star Trek is a thrilling and visually dynamic blockbuster spectacle, loaded with humor, heart, and action that doesn’t sacrifice great characters. It’s a blast from start to finish, and it’s one of Abrams’ best films. – Adam Chitwood Image via Netflix Director: Sara Colangelo Writers: Leigh Janiack and Phil Graziadei , Zak Olkewicz , Phil Graziadei and Leigh Janiak and Kate Trefry The John Hughes classic Ferris Bueller's Day Off captures the “senioritis” feeling of skipping school and hanging out with your friends perfectly, genuinely giving the viewer the feeling of being right alongside Ferris for his titular day off. Of course that’s due in no small part to Matthew Broderick ’s mix of charm, smart-aleck, and sarcasm that makes up his tremendous lead performance, and he and Hughes hit the fourth wall-breaking in the absolute perfect manner. But Ferris Bueller doesn’t endure simply because it’s a good time—the film is actually quite melancholic, as it touches on the impending loss of youth and approaches relationships with a mature honesty that’s lacking in many 80s high school comedies. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off is simply one of the most rewatchable films ever made, which means it’s perfect for a Netflix spin pretty much anytime. – Adam Chitwood Image via Paramount Pictures Director: Phil Alden Robinson Cast: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana, John Cho, Simon Pegg, Karl Urban, Anton Yelchin, Bruce Greenwood, and Eric Bana Cast: Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert De Niro, Jacki Weaver, Chris Tucker, and Julia Stiles Cast: Mark Wahlberg, Julianne Moore, Burt Reynolds, Don Cheadle, John C. Reilly, William H. Macy, Heather Graham, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Luis Guzman, Philip Baker Hall, Thomas Jane, Alfred Molina, and Ricky Jay It’s tickling to no end that a Best Director Oscar nominee is the same mastermind behind such silliness as Anchorman and Step Brothers . But writer/director Adam McKay ’s masterful hold over tone and subject matter in The Big Short is simply an extension of something he’d been doing for years, with Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby acting as one of the biggest dupings of general audiences in recent memory. On the surface, it’s a silly comedy starring Will Ferrell as a goofy race car driver. But at its heart, Talladega Nights is a searing takedown of corporate culture and “Southern pride.” It’s incredibly effective, with hilarious supporting turns by John C. Reilly and Molly Shannon upping the goof factor exponentially and the late Michael Clarke Duncan showing a side of himself audiences had never seen before. This is Adam McKay doing what he does best, only on a broader canvas and with considerably more Mountain Dew. – Adam Chitwood Image via Netflix Director: George C. Wolfe Cast: Leonardo DiCaprio, Marion Cotillard, Ellen Page, Ken Watanabe, Michael Caine, Cillian Murphy, Tom Hardy, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt Cast: Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks, Christopher Walken, Martin Sheen, and Amy Adams Image via Warner Bros. Director/Writer: Christopher Nolan Cast: Michael Douglas, Deborah Kara Unger, Sean Penn, James Rebhorn Ah, the glorious 90s when you could make an R-rated tentpole summer action movie that’s basically Die Hard except it’s Air Force One instead of Nakatomi Tower and it’s the President of the United States instead of a New York cop visiting his estranged wife. The simple premise of Air Force One has remained durable and entertaining thanks to the A casting of Harrison Ford as the action star President and Gary Oldman as the leader of the Russian terrorists who take over the President’s plane. Wolfgang Petersen manages the action well and gives it a particularly nasty bite when necessary to raise the stakes while still allowing for the rah-rah heroism of the President punching terrorists. – Matt Goldberg 'Sex Education's Aimee Lou Wood Shares Vital Advice Received from the Show’s Intimacy Coordinator on Doing Sex Scenes "No is no and maybe is no. Only an absolute yes is a yes." Cast: Harrison Ford, Gary Oldman, Wendy Crewson, Paul Guilfoyle, William H. Macy, Liesel Matthews, Dean Stockwell, and Glenn Close Trying to find the best movie to watch on . You have the entirety of Netflix at your disposal, including even a pared-down list of films you’ve already bookmarked to watch at a future date. But then there’s the choosing. You’ve gotta find something that fits your mood, or something you and your friend/significant other/couch companion can agree on. You spend hours browsing, and by the time you stumble on something you think maybe is the one, it’s too late, you’re too tired, and indecision has won out. We don't talk about it enough, but Catch Me If You Can is absolutely one of Steven Spielberg’s best films that also boasts one of Leonardo DiCaprio ’s best performances and one of John Williams ’ best scores—and all of that is saying something. Based on a true story, DiCaprio plays Frank Abagnale Jr., who became a professional con man by the age of 19, earning millions of dollars while trotting around the globe. But at heart, Catch Me If You Can is the story of a father and a son, and is actually one of Spielberg’s most personal films he’s ever made—it was directly influenced by Spielberg learning new information about his father’s divorce. But this movie is also an absolute blast. – Adam Chitwood RELATED: Here's What's New on Netflix in September 2021 Cast: Jack Black, Joan Cusack, Mike White, and Sarah Silverman Image via New Line Cinema Director: Jay Roach
Writers: John Brancato and Michael Ferris Image via New Line Cinema Director/Writer: Paul Thomas Anderson Image via DreamWorks Director: Steven Spielberg Inarguably one of the best Netflix originals ever, the Fear Street trilogy is the perfect binge-watch. This adaptation of the R.L. Stine book series is an interconnected trilogy of horror movies, each with its own tone and twist on the slasher genre, bound by characters and mythology. The action begins in Fear Street: 1994 , which introduces the town of Shadyside where everything bad always tends to happen. A group of teenagers find themselves hunted down by a bevy of serial killers from the town's past, only to discover the culprit may be a centuries-old curse. The second film, Fear Street: 1978 , is a summer camp slasher that goes into Shadyside's past to recount a horrific event while revealing more of the mythology until the third and final movie, Fear Street: 1666 , works as an origin story for the curse and the Shadyside Witch. These movies absolutely rule, and are perfect for a Friday night date night. - Adam Chitwood Watch Ma Rainey's Black Bottom on Netflix If you're in the mood to watch something that's going to make you feel good, School of Rock is guaranteed to do the trick. The 2003 film stars Jack Black as an aspiring musician and full-time slacker who poses as his roommate to take a job as a substitute teacher, only to spend his entire class time teaching his young students how to become rock musicians. The music is killer, and the chemistry between Black and Joan Cusack is off the charts. You've also got Richard Linklater bringing his signature humanisitic touch to a story that easily could have fallen prey to a "TV Movie of the Week" type of rollout. — Adam Chitwood The 2020 film Ma Rainey's Black Bottom is a powerhouse showcase for the acting talents of all involved, including Chadwick Boseman in his final live-action performance. Based on the stage play of the same name, the film chronicles a day in the life of iconic recording artist Ma Rainey as she assembles her team to record a new album on a hot summer day in 1927. Tensions rise and the dialogue crackles between these various characters, as Boseman's trumpeter dreams of making it big on his own while the temperamental Ma Rainey knows what lies ahead all too well. This is an excellent performance-driven drama. - Adam Chitwood Image via Pathe Director: Stephen Frears Writers: Peter Benchley and Carl Gottlieb Best Movies on recommended movies on netflix now Netflix Right NowBest Movies on recommended movies on netflix now Netflix Right Now Cast: best action movies on amazon prime 2020